The Howl #3 – Vainglory

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It’s time for another Howl! This time we talk Vainglory and other things with our Vainglory boys Alexander “Keygasza” Rudolph and Sebastian “Chrysior” Lautenbach. We talked about the new 5v5 mode of Vainglory, what kind of game they would develop and what hero they hate the most. Let’s get into it!

Hello guys, as usual we start with the introduction of who you are. So please go ahead!
Chrysior: Hey, I’m Sebastian „Chrysior“ Lautenbach. Im 16 years old and I live in Germany. I am the main support player for Wolves‘ Vainglory team.

Keygasza: Hi, my name is Alexander Rudolph or Keygasza. I live in Hamm, Germany. There are two things in my life that are important to me – football and gaming. I’m a competitive person by nature and love to dismantle opponents that are a lot stronger on paper by playing mindgames.

Chrysior, you  went to the DreamHack Leipzig, met some other Wolves and got to play Vainglory in a 5v5 show match on stage. How was it?
Chrysior: The Dreamhack in Leipzig was the first ever gaming event I attended. Meeting some of the Wolves there and hanging out together was great. In addition, getting my hands on Vainglory’s brand new 5v5 gamemode on the event stage and playing together with Sn1x in front of a huge audience was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had!

Next question goes to Keygasza – What was it like to be a part of FNATIC?
Keygasza: It was an important experience for me and I was able take in the atmosphere on stage as well as getting to see a lot of the world. Also, getting an insight into how a premier esports organisation works was pretty informative. Another memorable experience was the bootcamp in Los Angeles. All that showed me that I want to be in gaming and esports and that I belong here.

What are your opinions and expectations of the new 5v5 mode of Vainglory?
Chrysior: Vainglory 5v5 is something I have been waiting for since early 2017 and I’m very happy that it’s finally out. Now, after about one month full of scrims I’ve slowly found out how the mode works and I’m honestly impressed. It provides a way deeper strategical depth than the 3v3 mode and perfectly combines mechanical skill cap with macroplay. I think the 5v5 mode will become the main game mode for Vainglory in the future, both for casual and competitive play. It is great already and I see a lot of potential in it.

Keygasza: I think that the 5v5 mode is still at the very beginning but has a lot of potential. Since I already have a lot of experience in other MOBA games (DotA2, LoL, HotS etc.) that are being played 5v5 I believe that, if we work hard enough, can build an early advantage that could mean we are one of the winners of the change so I’m pretty confident looking forward.

Looking at the future, what are your wishes when it comes to the team and Vainglory in general?
Chrysior: I hope many new people will get to know Vainglory and how fun it is. With a growing playerbase there will also be a growing esports scene and thats obviously what I wish for the future.

Keygasza: My biggest wish for Vainglory is a better organisation and transparency when it comes to leagues, tournaments and the game itself and that the competitive scene is becoming more successful. Talking about the team, I hope that we’ll be able to take the step from being a semi-pro team to becoming a pro team, especially with the change to 5v5. I’m confident we can achieve it if we continue the way we are on right now.

What are your favourite and most hated heroes in the game?
Chrysior: My favorite hero is definitley Lance. He is a strong captain that provides tons of crowd control for his team. The hero I hate the most is Reza. He is easy to play and still does insane damage.

Keygasza: Most hated is definitely Alpha. A hero with a minimal skill cap shouldn’t be one of the top damage dealers in the game. My all-time favourite has to be Idris as he is a perfect example of “easy to play, hard to master” and his outplay potential gives me exactly what I look for in a hero.

If you wouldn’t be able to play Vainglory or any other MOBA game anymore, what would you play and why?
Chrysior: I would propably start playing a battle royale game like PUBG. Although I haven’t played much of it yet, I’m a huge fan of its esport scene and it seems to be pretty fun.

Keygasza: To relax I prefer games like Borderlands, Age of Empires or roguelike indie games. To satisfy my competitve need I’d most likely go back to FPS games as the tactical component in higher skill ranges fits me a lot.

Imagine you are game developers and could develop the game of your dreams – What would it look like?
Chrysior: A game developed by myself would be a strategic type of game with a high skillcap. Maybe a 1st person – 2 Lanes MOBA?

Keygasza: If I were to develop a game.. most likely a technical roguelike.

Which game is a “must-play” for everyone?
Chrysior: Of course everyone should give Vainglory a try, but also GTA5 is one of those games everyone should have played already.

Keygasza: Borderlands and Binding of Isaac.

If you are not playing games, what are you doing?
Chrysior: Apart from gaming I mostly focus on school stuff, but I also like playing clarinet, watching movies and hanging out with friends.

Keygasza: Football and bad jokes.

We’re done with the questions and now it’s your turn to say some things!
Chrysior: I hope for a nice time in the future with Wolves. Our roster is doing great so far and I’m looking forward to competing with them in the Vainglory esport scene.

Keygasza: I can’t wait to wear the Wolves jersey on big stages. Remember my name, you’ll see it again.

New Partner: eByte

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We’re happy to announce a new partner for Wolves eSportseByte

The eByte is a cryptocurrency specifically designed for gaming and esports and after the first talk with the people behind the eByte project, it was pretty clear that there is a big overlap in ideas and goals for both projects and the esport community in general. With a match that great, both parties quickly came to the conclusion to support each other going forward and we are excited to see where the journey takes the eByte and Wolves eSports.

To allow you to take a closer look at what the eByte actually is, here is a short introduction that can be found on the Ebyte.cash website:

Vision of the eByte

The main objective of the eByte project is the creation of an internationally accepted and widely used monetary system for esports. Whether players, dedicated teams, leagues of different game genres, streamers, admins or modders – every esport enthusiast should be able to benefit from his or her commitment. By using eBytes, all achievements in the field of digital sport are to be adequately remunerated and the decentralized nature of esport is to be maintained.

To achieve this goal, various platforms will be created in advance. Currently we develop a contract system as well as a service market that allows providers of services (e.g. streaming, modding, casting) to offer their services in exchange for appropriate compensation in eByte. Additionally we develop a multiplayer football manager with an integrated eByte monetary system. The use of our portals is not a must to trade with eByte since immediately after the publication of our coins, trading with eBytes will be possible on common Crypto exchanges.

To read more about the eByte project, go check out their website and social media below.

Website: www.eByte.cash
Facebook: eByteCommunity
Twitter: @eByteCommunity

The Howl #2 – DreamHack Edition

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From left to right: dontbemad, Sn1x, Blank, Butterflywolve

As you may have seen on our social media Wolves eSports attended DreamHack Leipzig at the end of January.

With Tobias “Blank” Endres, Jannik”dontbemad” Hellebrandt, and  Franz “Jose_Zlatan” Zech, we had three players who qualified for the Hearthstone Win the Winter tournament by TaKeTV and the Sony PS Masters 2018 in FIFA 18 respectively. With  Sebastian “Chrysior” Lautenbach from our Vainglory team and Patrick “Butterflywolve” Freier and Fabio “Sn1x” Coelho from our management attending the event, there have been six Wolves on the prowl at DreamHack. The DreamHack Leipzig was our first major event and we’re happy to have been given the opportunity to attend not just as spectators, but as players.

While “Jose_Zlatan” lost his first match in the PS Masters, the quarter finals, against the player who finished the event in 2nd place and was quickly elimininated, “Blank” and “dontbemad” managed to get into round 5 of the lower bracket where both of them lost their match unfortunately. Apart from that, “Chrysior” and “Sn1x” represented Wolves during the first on-stage 5v5 Vainglory match in Europe.

After the DreamHack was done and everyone had some time to reflect on their tournaments, we asked the three players a couple of questions about DreamHack, their goals and what they learned during their stay in Leipzig.

Hello guys, would you be so kind to shortly introduce yourselves?
Blank: Hi, my name is Tobias Endres and I’m 25 years old. I started playing Hearthstone in March 2017 and invest a lot of time into the game since then. At the end of last year, I was able to win my first tournaments and very happy about my progress so far.

dontbemad: Hi, I’m Jannik. I am 27 years old and live in the vicinity of Dortmund, Germany.

Jose_Zlatan: My name is Franz Zech and my gamertag is “Jose Zlatan”. I live close to Dresden on Saxony, Germany and I’m 21 years old. Just recently I joined Wolves eSports as a FIFA player which also has been the start of my esports career. Currently, I study to become a teacher in maths and sports. In my freetime I play football in the sixth division.

 

What was the experience like? Especially compared to online play and being able to see your opponent.
Blank: Playing online offers some kind of convenience as you are able to play in a familiar environment without having to travel and taking care of other things. However, I prefer offline as I enjoy the face-2-face situation. It’s a lot more exciting.

dontbemad: It’s always different to see your opponent compared to online play at home. You can always take a look at your opponent and try to interpret the reactions and facial expressions.

Jose_Zlatan: The DreamHack has been my first offline event and it was a completely new experience for me. First of all, you have a  lot more respect for your opponent if you sit across from him as he went through the same qualifier. Second, you can’t create the same level of focus and concentration as I can do at home. I usually listen to music and that helps me concentrate. It simply didn’t work for me this time. I was a bit too excited as people were watching me play FIFA  and you were still able to hear outside noise from the event despite headsets and music. However, it was pretty cool to be able to meet and talk to the people which isn’t always possible online.

 

FIFA: You lost your first match against the player who finished 2nd. What was your impression of the other participants?
Jose_Zlatan: Despite the FUT Champions Cup in Barcelona which took place at the same time, the competition was pretty strong. Everyone had to deliver over an extended period of time to qualify and everyone was at the same level in my opinion. The only real difference has been the experience that a few players lacked, including me. That might have been a small advantage for the others.

 

FIFA: Looking back at the event and your performance, what can you learn and improve on?
Jose_Zlatan: Of course I want to qualify for more offline events in the future, maybe even the PS Masters again if they happen. I had some decent talks with other players and the commentators and was able to identify a few issues I need to work on. For example, I need to cross more. I haven’t done that yet as they haven’t been useful in FIFA17 and kind of neglected them in FIFA18 so far. I also played too slow when attacking. Those fast passes can be extremely dangerous. Everyone had to deal with some kind of delay which made that a bit harder, at least for me. Depending on the situation, I could also change formation a lot more, to see what helps me score more goals. Overall, I need to adapt to certain situations quicker than I do right now. Learning new formations to become more flexible is another goal for me.

 

Hearthstone: The DreamHack used the Last Hero Standing format instead of the usual Conquest format. What is your take on that?
Blank: I prefer LHS over Conquest as a tournament mode. In LHS, it comes down to the lineup as well as the pick order. Without a decently balanced lineup you can get 3-0’d pretty easily.

dontbemad: I always preferred LHS. You need to have a lot more variation in your lineup to be able to counter different decks. It’s less dependent on queueing good matchups compared to conquest.

Hearthstone: What is your take on the meta? Have there been any surprises during your matches?
Blank: I actually like the current meta. Raza priest has been my favorite deck to play since I started even though a lot of people hate it. Strong decks such as the Raza priest do not bother me as much as RNG or high roll effects like Spiteful Summoner.

dontbemad: The meta did not really surprise me. It was clear that most people would play the 4 strongest decks since it was open deck list. You weren’t able to surprise anyone but I still played against a Quest Druid which confused me a bit.

 

Hearthstone: Let’s talk about the nerfs after the event. What are your opinions on that?
Blank: I have mixed feelings about the nerfs. Yes, the correct cards are nerfed but we still have to see if the meta changes in the desired direction in the future.

dontbemad: I think the nerfs are understandable. I don’t get why they happen now though. A lot of these cards could have been nerfed a while ago and not just shortly before the rotation. I was surprised that the Warlock dodged any nerf. Overall, I’m still happy Blizzard reacted with these nerfs.

Was it your first offline event? What impressed you the most?
Blank: I was able to get some offline experience in the Innogy Card Master Series and managed to bring that over to the DreamHack. I haven’t been as nervous as I was in Bochum (Innogy Card Master Series).

dontbemad: It was my second offline event since I played the offline finals of the Innogy Card Master Series in Bochum last year. Playing offline at DreamHack wasn’t a first for me and I knew a lot of the players there already. However, the atmosphere at DreamHack was something special.

 

What have you been able to learn during DreamHack?
Blank: You have to put in a lot of time preparing for the tournament and develop some kind of serenity. Participating here shows you what esports means.

dontbemad: That I should definitely go there a day earlier than I did to have a good nights sleep before the tournament starts. Waking up at 4 in the morning, sitting in a train for 5 hours and then having to play 8-10 hours of high level Hearthstone was pretty exhausting.

Jose_Zlatan: That I need to constantly improve to be prepared a lot better for the next offline event. Well, and I can take this whole experience with me.

 

What are your goals for the next few months?
Blank: I want to continue to improve and to qualify for a seasonal championship in 2018.

dontbemad: I would like to win a Challenger Cup and participate in local Tavern Heroes if possible as I don’t have the time to reach a high finish in the ladder at the moment.

Jose_Zlatan: To constantly improve of course. Recently I managed 39 wins in the weekend league for the first time. I want to be in the top100 a lot more in the future and I’d love to play more offline events and keep qualifying for them.

 

Now that we’re done with the questions it’s your time to say something!
Blank: I’m happy I joined my first esports team and hope that 2018 will be a successful year for Wolves and me.

dontbemad: Huge thank you to Patrick and Fabio for their support during the DreamHack! It was great meeting them and Tobias in person, to get to know them. I hope we’ll see each other during other events. Shoutouts to the rest of the Wolves out there!

Following are some images from DreamHack Leipzig – #GoWolves

 

 

The Howl #1 – wusi

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The Howl is our new format where we go ahead and ask the Wolves questions about their life and gaming to allow them to take the spotlight. There will be a new episode every two weeks with a special DreamHack episode shortly after the event finished.

For the first episode one of our longest standing members takes the spotlight – Our Smash player Benjamin “wusi” Baye!
Benjamin has been with Wolves since September 2016 and has been the best performing Smash player for Wolves since then. No wonder, he managed to win three events in a row shortly after he joined Wolves eSports. The year 2017 was a bit rougher for him as he unfortunately wasn’t able to power through with the same dominance. However, his results were still pretty good.

But without further ado, here’s the interview:

Question: Hello wusi! Thanks for taking the time to answer a few questions. We’d like to start with a short introduction of yourself.
Hi, my name is Benjamin “wusi” Baye, I’m 24 years old and play Super Smash Bros here at Wolves eSports. I managed to establish myself in the scene and currently sit at 5th place of the German Power Ranking.

Question: What are the main things you do outside of gaming?
Well, during the day I work a side job and attend evening classes to work on my A-levels to become an engineer. After that I hit the gym 5 days a week to stay fit and healthy.

Question: Talking about gaming, what was your first video game?
Sonic the Hedgehog for the Sega Mega Drive!

Question: Since you play Super Smash Bros. for Wolves, would you mind to tell us how you started with Smash?
I played Smash for the first time at the age of 5. We got it with the Nintendo 64 back in the days and I was never able to leave the franchise since then. After I heard about Brawl tournaments in my vicinity I picked it up competitively in 2012.

Question: What are your goals for 2018?
To keep up with my current routine of work, education and gym first and foremost. Another goal for me is to climb the German Power Ranking again and to establish myself in the world wide Smash scene as I want to attend at least one american event and perform well.

Question: If you’d never be able to touch Smash again, what game would you pick up instead?
Dragon Ball FighterZ for the PS4. Just an incredibly good game!

Question: If you were able to change 1 or 2 things  in Super Smash Bros.m what would you change and why?
I’d remove Bayonetta. Or at least change her since she is quite broken. As for my second change – I would like to buff the low tier characters to make them tournament viable and allow for more diversity in characters that way. I would love to see more characters being played.

Question: You are known for your Fox. Why did you choose him and who would you play if you couldn’t play Fox?
I saw a Japanese player named “Yui” play Fox back in 2012, His gameplay was pretty smooth and it inspired me to play Fox myself. I came to love his agility and his rushdown based play style. If I had to choose a different character, I’d say that Toon Link and Greninja have decent chances as they are pretty fast and allow for different play styles.

Question: We know you love Fox, but who do you hate the most?
I have an aversion for Bayonetta and Sheik as they are bad matchups for Fox. Especially Bayonetta, she can always kill you with something. And she has Witch Time. I guess nobody likes that. Well, apart from Bayonetta players.

Question: Thank you for your answers, we’re done! If you want to say anything, this would be your chance!
Thank you for the interview and for allowing me to be a part of Wolves eSports! I’m here for more than a year now and enjoy being here. Let 2018 be a fantastic year for Smash in esports and I hope I’ll be able to represent Wolves as good as I have done in the past!

Partnership with StriveWire ends

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After we agreed on a partnership with StriveWire in March 2017, we’re now announcing that this partnership has come to an end.

With the recent changes made to the Hearthstone Championship Tour cups, we’re unable to continue our cup series. We thank StriveWire for enabling us to do that in the first place and wish them all the best in the future. Both StriveWire and Wolves eSports continue their journey in Hearthstone and for us that means we have at least one player attending Dreamhack Leipzig which is the next big thing we’re looking forward to.

Recap of 2017 & a Happy New Year!

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Another year has run past us and it’s time to take a look at what has happened in the last 12 months – Our recap of 2017.

The year 2017 was quite exciting for us in many ways as we picked up teams and players in several games for the first time in the history of Wolves eSports that delivered and soon will deliver new experiences for all of us. It’s been the second year after our decision to put a lot more time and effort in Wolves eSports and we’re more than happy to say that the year was a great year for us. Sure, we haven’t been able to achieve all the goals we set ourselves for 2017 but we certainly learned a whole lot of things during the process that we are going to use in our advantage in 2018.

January 2017 was the comeback of two games that we’ve already seen as a part of Wolves eSports, DotA 2 and World of Tanks. The new game, or rather game mode we signed a team for was FIFA Pro Club. As we picked the team up, they’ve already been sitting on top of the league and kept that position until the end to be promoted to the second highest league in the FIFA ProLeague. In February, we started the next big adventure with a team in Paladins. Later on, the team then came close to qualifying for the Paladins Masters LAN which still saw several of our players standing in for other teams. We rounded up the month of February with another return of a game to Wolves eSports – namely Heroes of the Storm. Last but not least, we started our weekly Hearthstone cup series on StriveWire for Hearthstone Championship Tour points with great success.

March 2017 and April were rather quiet months in terms of announcements as the only things happening were an agreement on a partnership deal with StriveWire in March, while we said goodbye to the FIFA Pro Club team. May 2017 was a rough month as our Paladins team, back then considered to be Top4 in Europe, moved on to Burrito Esports. However, we are still strongly interested in the game and wish to re-enter the scene in 2018. May also meant the arrival of two CSGO teams – a German team, and a British team. In the following months we ventured into new games for Wolves eSports quite a lot with Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds, Vainglory, SMITE, and recently even picked up a team in WarCraft 3. Apart from quite a few additions, we’ve also seen teams leave and change more than we hoped for which is something we want to work on for next year. With our current lineup of teams and players in CSGO Germany, SMITE, Vainglory, DotA 2, WarCraft 3, Hearthstone, FIFA 18 and Super Smash Bros we’re looking forward to 2018 from a teams perspective. From a business point of view, we’ve worked a lot recently and have a few announcements and changes to make in early 2018 so we’re stoked about those things as well!

That being said, 2017 was a year full of learning and growing in the ways we handle things with a lot of great memories, but also a few bad ones. However, we feel like we were able to learn from them and can’t wait to continue working with our teams and partners, especially Gamers Apparel in the new year. Some great things are coming up as well and we can’t wait to share them with you.

Until then we wish all of our fans & followers, teams, players, and partners a Happy New Year! We’ll see you soon!

#GoWolves

Merry Christmas from Wolves eSports

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It’s the 24th of December and that means it’s Christmas!

We wish a Merry Christmas to our players and teams, our partners and everyone following Wolves eSports. Hopefully, you get to spend quality time with your families and loved ones and have an awesome holiday! We’ll be back after christmas to continue working on our 2018 projects and we’ll come back to you at least once more until the year 2017 is done, we promise.

Until then, Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Wolves eSports Community Discord

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We thought about launching a Community Discord for quite some time now and after Discord released channel categories we thought of ways to make it happen – and here it is!

Our official Wolves eSports Community Discord is meant to be another media outlet for people interested in Wolves eSports and friends of ours. We’ve created news channels for all games we have teams in that will feature updates on matches, leagues, and general news about our teams. If you want to talk about other eSport titles or games that you like to play – we have the channels for it! Our management, and most importantly, our players are going to be there as well to allow for communication between Wolves and you via text and voice channels. We would like to give this project a try and see where it takes us.

Invite Link – Wolves eSports Community Discord

In case you join the Discord, please make sure to read the rules and if you have any feedback regarding our Discord server, do not hesitate to contact us through the means mentioned in the #welcome channel.

#GoWolves

Wolves eSports minus 2 Teams

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It’s been a while since we published a news on our website and we certainly don’t do it with a happy face this time around. Our former CSGO.uk team decided to part ways with us after just one season of ESEA Intermediate filled with lineup changes and struggles. We were looking forward to the new season with a working team but unfortunately, they decided to move on to pursue other options.

The second team to leave Wolves eSports as well is the DotA 2 lineup. The team disbanded and the remaining players don’t feel like building a new team again. Sad to see as the new season for the joinDota League was recently announced and we were already looking forward to it.

And the last change regarding Wolves eSports players sees a departure of Hearthstone player Albert “Trebzilla” Sillem.

We wish all of our former teams and players all the best in the future. We’d also like to say that we are looking for new teams in those games again.

Wolves Weekend Recap

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Last weekend has seen quite some action for Wolves eSports and our players in different games with equally great results – Time for a recap. We’ve had Benjamin “wusi” Baye attend the Albion 2 Super Smash Bros event in the United Kingdom, the new DotA 2 team play the ESL Go4DotA Europe #118, our FIFA players in the FIFA Sunday Madness Cup Germany, and last but not least our Hearthstone players battle it out for the top ranks in June’s EU Ladder.

Super Smash Bros.:
The United Kingdom, more specifically London, was the goal for our smash player Benjamin “wusi” Baye to attend the Albion 2 event. Filled with great players from all over Europe it was meant to be one of the bigger events this year and with 308 participants in the Singles competition it certainly has been. With a 7-1 set record and 15-3 games he took first place in his group to move on to the 64 player bracket. There, he went on to the Winners Quarter-Final where he went down 0-3 against Glutonny, who then went on to win the event. Wusi however managed to reach the top 8 through the Lower Bracket, finishing the event on a great 7th place.

DotA 2:
The debut appearance for the new Wolves eSports DotA 2 team was the ESL Go4DotA Europe Cup #118 where they managed to reach the final in a breeze to face “Team Moriarty”. The final opponent however was a mountain they’ve not been able to climb after the early game was decent and both teams were even. Still, great performance in their first tournament for Wolves.

FIFA 17:
The weekly German Sunday Madness Cup has seen two Wolves fight for glory on the pitch and with Sebastian “iBastinho” Holsten & Alexander “alexklarman” Schmausz both of them reached the quarter finals where Alexander lost his match to finish 5-8th. Sebastian managed to win the cup in a final where he faced GOOKU who has some decent results in the German Championship and the 2016 ESWC under his belt.

Hearthstone:
The monthly ladder came to an end during the night from Friday to Saturday and one of our players, Albert “Trebzilla” Sillem, finished it on a good 11th place, netting him 8 Hearthstone Championship Tour points.

We surely hope that all teams and players can keep up their great performances in the future! GGWP this weekend!

 

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